Children's Rights Training

Children’s Rights – In-house Training and Support

OUTLINEMASTERCLASS THEMESOUR TRAINERWHY CHILDREN'S RIGHTS?WHO NEEDS TO KNOW?
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Policy Hub Scotland has teamed up with Tam Baillie, formerly Scotland’s Commissioner for Children and Young People (2009-2017), to offer a series of bespoke training opportunities to organisations committed to improving their approach to children’s rights.

We have designed a series of highly interactive ‘Children’s Rights’ masterclasses that can be shaped to suit the learning and development needs of professionals working in schools and wider integrated children’s services. The masterclass themes include –

  • UNCRC: the basics
  • UNCRC: Understanding and Delivering Children’s Participation
  • Educational Attainment and Children’s rights
  • Children’s rights and mental health and wellbeing in a school setting
  • Children’s rights and mental health and wellbeing (general focus)
  • Children’s rights and the early years
  • Children’s rights and Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)
  • Children’s right to rest, leisure, play and cultural activities
  • Children’s rights reporting obligations
  • Children’s rights and juvenile justice

Being mindful of the demands on everyone’s time, each masterclass is an intensive half-day training session and can be delivered in your school or your local Council/Health Board offices on a date that suits – indeed, clients often choose to tag a half-day training session on to an existing school in-service day or Authority-wide training day.

Each masterclass is:

  • an interactive half-day training session (full-day sessions can be created to cover a particular theme in greater detail or to include two of the masterclass topics listed)
  • designed for a maximum of 35 attendees
  • valued at £600 per session

We are also conscious of the various pressures on training budgets – should service providers (such as a Council and a Health Board or a cluster of schools) wish to pool together to purchase a masterclass, they are welcome to do so. This can work particularly well for providers that have complimentary or overlapping remits; or for Councils/schools that operate in more rural or remote locations.

If you have any queries or would like more information, please contact Mark on 0131 344 4611 or drop him an email at mbellamy@policyhubscotland.co.uk

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Masterclass Themes and Format

Each of the masterclasses will run for a half day session. Tam will use examples to illustrate his key points and it is expected that attendees will bring their own experience to the training. Participants will have the opportunity to learn from presentations, reflect on their own practice and discuss how this can be improved based on the information provided. Previous sessions have shown that participants know a lot more than they think they know – and they leave with the confidence to put their knowledge into practice.

Our catalogue of masterclasses can be viewed in PDF form (here) or via the list below –

> ‘UNCRC: the basics’
> ‘UNCRC: Understanding and Delivering Children’s Participation’
> ‘Educational Attainment and Children’s rights’
> ‘Children’s rights and mental health and wellbeing in a school setting’
> ‘Children’s rights and mental health and wellbeing (general focus)’
> ‘Children’s rights and the early years’
> ‘Children’s rights and Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)’
> ‘Children’s right to rest, leisure, play and cultural activities’
> ‘Children’s rights reporting obligations’
> ‘Children’s rights and juvenile justice’

‘UNCRC: the basics’

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This masterclass offers an introduction to The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC), including the historical context of the UNCRC, linkages with other relevant treaty and human rights bodies and an explanation of articles, terminology and structures. It is recommended for all participants.

‘UNCRC: Understanding and Delivering Children’s Participation’

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This session provides an introduction to children’s participation and the application of Article 12. It will cover approaches to participation, tools of engagement and how to ensure the ongoing involvement and monitoring by children and young people. It is recommended for all participants.

‘Educational Attainment and Children’s Rights’

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This masterclass covers research linking children’s rights and attainment and will provide tools for the implementation of children’s rights in learning settings. It is designed to increase confidence in applying a participatory approach in an education role. It is suitable for anyone with a remit in education, particularly those in school settings and interested in raising attainment.

‘Children’s rights and mental health and wellbeing in a school setting’

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This session will cover the key aspects and challenges of children’s rights and mental health in a school setting. It will consider child and adolescent mental health and wellbeing in the general context of influences on children’s lives and in the specific context of the school environment and Curriculum for Excellence. It will cover practical steps that can be taken to address issues of mental health and wellbeing and is suitable for anyone responsible for children and young people in a school. This can be teaching staff, support staff, the senior management team, mental health practitioners and those responsible for allocating resources for the mental health and wellbeing of children and young people.

‘Children’s rights and mental health and well-being’ (general focus)

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This masterclass will examine the key elements of children’s rights and mental health and well-being policy and practice in Scotland. It will include key aspects of child development and consider what improvements are required for better mental health and wellbeing of Scotland’s children. This session is suitable for anyone responsible for the mental health and wellbeing of children and young people – carers, practitioners, managers and policy makers at all levels.

‘Children’s rights and the early years’

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This session will explore what we already know about the fundamental importance of the early years and the relevance of children’s rights. It will ask attendees to examine how well we are doing in respect of children’s rights and the early years and consider potential improvements that could be made. This masterclass is suitable for anyone responsible for children and young people – particularly those involved in early years practice, management and policy.

‘Children’s rights and Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)’

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This masterclass will focus on Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), how they interact with the UNCRC and what can be done to minimise the impact. It will consider the key policy and practice drivers in Scotland for tackling ACEs, as well as exploring how future improvements can be made in respect of children’s rights and the reduction of ACEs. This session is suitable for anyone responsible for children and young people – particularly those involved in promoting health and wellbeing.

‘Children’s right to rest, leisure, play and cultural activities’

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This training session reviews the key elements of article 31 and the related General Comment 17. It will consider the recent changes in children’s access to play opportunities and what needs to be done to improve your policy and practice in respect of UNCRC Article 31. This masterclass is suitable for anyone involved in play or responsible for the mental health and wellbeing of children and young people – carers, practitioners, managers and policy makers at all levels.

‘Children’s rights reporting obligations’

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This masterclass explores the children’s rights reporting requirements of the Children and Young People Act, 2014. It will focus on the need for baseline information and to produce a Children’s Rights Report, as well as considering how organisations can perform ongoing monitoring and make improvements to ensure the realisation of children’s rights. The session is suitable to officers in public bodies covered by the Act – particularly those with a responsibility for reporting on the UNCRC.

‘Children’s rights and juvenile justice’

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This session covers the range of rights treaties and instruments in respect of juvenile justice. It will consider the importance of child development and the strengths and weaknesses of the interaction of children’s rights and juvenile justice in Scotland. This masterclass is suitable for anyone working or responsible for children interacting with juvenile justice in Scotland.

Our Trainer

Tam Baillie, former Scotland Commissioner for Children and Young People
@tam_baillie

Tam was Scotland’s Commissioner for Children and Young People from May 2009 to May 2017. As Commissioner, Tam had a duty to promote and safeguard the rights of children and young people in Scotland through: raising awareness of children’s rights; involving children and young people in his work; and influencing law, policy and practice with children and young people.

Since demitting office, Tam has built up an extensive training portfolio focussed on developing a greater awareness and understanding of children’s rights within the workforce. Tam currently holds the following roles:

  • Chair of the Shetland Public Protection Committee (Adult and Child)
  • Chair of the Western Isles Child Protection Committee
  • Board member of the Scottish Children’s Reporter Administration
  • Advisory Group member of Moorehouse Residential School
  • Board member of the International Play Association (World)
  • Board member of the International Play Association (Scotland)
  • Board member of Upstart (campaigning for kindergartens in education)
  • Ambassador for the Cyrenians, Edinburgh
  • Ambassador for the Licketyspit Children’s Theatre Company


Why Children’s Rights?

The UK signed up to The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) in 1991 and as a result we have international obligations to maximise the realisation of children’s rights in Scotland. These are responsibilities on government at all levels, organisations and anyone with an involvement in nurturing the development of children. The UNCRC is complemented by a series of General Comments which are published by the Committee to shed light on the expectations and interpretations of key aspects of the UNCRC. These are important guides for the realisation of children’s rights and useful in better implementation of the UNCRC.

UN scrutiny through the Committee on the Rights of the Child has an increasing impact on government policy which is required to respond to the report cards on performance that are periodically produced – these are known as Concluding Observations and the latest UK report was published in 2016.

The Scottish Government has taken a progressive approach to the implementation of the Concluding Observations and strengthening the legal framework in respect of children’s rights.

Who needs to know?

The UNCRC is relevant for the whole children’s workforce and the adult workforce where children are part of families. This includes –

  • carers
  • staff responsible for the delivery of services to children and families
  • managers responsible for allocating resources for children and young people
  • policy makers at all levels
  • senior managers directing policy and resources.

The reach is extensive and there is a requirement for organisations to ensure staff are knowledgeable in what children’s rights mean and confident in how they incorporate them into their work.

A lot of positive work is already undertaken with children and young people, but this isn’t always seen through the prism of children’s rights. The performance of individuals and organisations can be strengthened through a greater awareness on where they are already doing well in respect of children’s rights, which can – in turn – shed light on where they can do better. This is where the partnership between Policy Hub Scotland and Tam Baillie comes in.